Tasting: Watermelon Radishes

Tastings are a great way to introduce new items to the school menu, incorporate education about local and seasonal produce during lunchtime, and receive feedback from students on which healthy foods they favor and will eat again.

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Tasting: Watermelon Radishes

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Tastings are a great way to introduce new items to the school menu, incorporate education about local and seasonal produce during lunchtime, and receive feedback from students on which healthy foods they favor and will eat again.

Watermelon radishes are just like other radishes, except they are bright pink and green and look like a watermelon on the inside. How cool is that?

Ingredients

Watermelon radishes
Kale
Rice wine vinegar
Sugar
Salt
Pepper

Method

Peel the watermelon radishes and slice into thin strips. Combine 1 part sugar to 2 parts rice wine vinegar and 1 tablespoon of salt. Mix until sugar and salt are dissolved. Add watermelon radish strips, cover, refrigerate and let sit for up to an hour or several hours. Before serving, wash and chop a few bunches of kale. Drain the watermelon radishes in a colander, and combine with the chopped kale. Toss together with salt and pepper to taste and serve!

Why Watermelon Radishes?

These particular watermelon radishes came from Trauger’s Farm in PA, so we were very excited to tell the students that our tasting ingredients were sourced locally. Local watermelon radishes in January, you ask? But of course! Radishes are a type of root vegetable, and along with potatoes, parsnips, beets and carrots, they can withstand the late fall temperatures and be harvested further into the season. Additionally, root vegetables have long shelf lives when stored properly in cool places, such as a refrigerator or root cellar, or when preserved through pickling or fermentation. This watermelon radish tasting was prepared with a quick pickle technique using rice wine vinegar and sugar. Quick pickling is great for many reasons. Not only will it satisfy your sudden urge for pickled anything, but it also lacks the added coloring and preservatives found in many store-bought pickled foods. So why watermelon radishes? They’re local, they’re seasonal, and they’re almost too beautiful to eat!

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